Cheerleading

Cheerleading is an intense physical activity based upon a routine which is composed of tumbling’s, dance, stunts, jumps, and cheers. It usually ranges from 2-5 minutes. The athletes who performed such things are called a cheerleader. It was originated from America which has over a million people who are participating in cheerleading competitions inside and outside of the country.

                               cheer1College cheerleaders performing a pyramid stunt.

It all started out as an all-male cheerleading group by Princeton University as early as 1877. It was not until 1898 that a student, Johnny Campbell  directed a crowd to cheer for their football team, thus making him the very first cheerleader and in November 12, 1898, the official birth of organized cheerleading. In 1907, women joined cheerleading because of of few men were involved in organized sports. Gymnastics, tumbling and megaphones were all that was used before. The 1980’s saw the beginning of modern cheerleading with more difficult stunt sequences and dangerous tumblings incorporated into their own routines. Today many corporations have organized cheerleading competitions. It includes the Cheerleading World Championships (CWC), ICU World Championships, National Cheerleading Competition (NCC) and etc.

                                    cheer2Logo of National Cheerleading Championship (NCC).

Most sports are deemed as risky because of the accidents that can come during training/performances. Cheerleading is considered as one of the most dangerous sports that have been created in the early 2000’s because it might cause your life in doing such dangerous stunts. A study has been occurred in 1982 to 2007 there were 103 fatal, disabling or serious injuries that recorded among female high school athletes. A female cheerleader suffered a fractured vertebra when she hit her head after she lost her balance during a stunt. In 2001 in the US, study says that over a 25,000 hospital visits were reported due to cheerleading injuries dealing with the shoulder, ankle, neck and head.

I was a cheerleader back when I was in high school. For me, it was one of a kind experience not because of having fun but to let me inspire other people in the brink of losing on a particular event on not giving up.

cheer3

A photo of me doing a one man full extension stunt.

 

We competed in the Milo Little Olympics held at the Marikina Sports Park, where other high school teams competed for the championship. We had so much fun on doing our routine and we hit every single stunt that we made but in the end, we ended up in 1st runner-up place. But it is still too early to be depressed because of the National Cheerleading Competition is still ongoing. We trained almost everyday, we prepare every piece of our routine and so the National Cheerleading Competition Elimination begins. We qualified and placed 2nd runner-up after our tremendous routine and even got the best pyramid amongst the other high school teams. After the eliminations, we think of ourselves on how much do we still need in order to bring back the the title of being a champion. We had little less than a month to prepare for the finals where the best schools all over the Philippines to take the spot as the champions. We tried to do trainings everyday but sadly because of events like the National Achievement Test, we had to lessen our trainings so that we could pass the exams. We only have a total of a week to prepare for the finals. Even though we practiced a lot and perform to our greatest, we didn’t grasp the title back to our hands and we are filled with depression. Still we know that we had some problems that occurred during the past month. After we graduated, we encourage the next batch of the team to train harder so when we come back, the title is within ours.

                         cheer4

The photo of my team competing on the National Cheerleading Competition.

 

Capanas, Paolo Mikkael M.

                                                                 

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